Advanced Placement® English Literature & Composition

Instructor: Deborah Simon, M.Ed. 

Email: judges4@gmail.com

"I teach AP Literature because I love it and because I want to share my love with others. I don't teach so I can help students pass a test or get college credit. My AP English Literature class will be a rigorous, college-level journey filled with in-depth discussions, animated debates, and analytical writing. It will be available to any student working at that ability level. Passing on the spark of passion is my goal as a teacher."
--Deborah Simon, M.Ed.

AP® Course Audit Authorization for English Literature and Composition

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Course Description

Athena’s online Advanced Placement® English Literature & Composition class is unique in its format and presentation. We will meet for live webinars to discuss a wide variety of literary works and practice the AP® English exam format together. We also offer one-on-one instruction and help during office hour times.

Our class is first and foremost a college-level English Literature class. Both the workload and the level of discussion and analysis will reflect that fact. That is not to say that you must be either a college student or a college-aged student to be here. Rather, it is your level of ability that determines your readiness for this class.

For most colleges and universities, a certain score on the AP English test or successfully completing the AP English class will grant you credit and allow you to skip the equivalent college class in your general education requirements since you have proven your mastery of the material. While this class is not a test prep class, you will learn the skills the test is designed to evaluate. We will not focus on preparing you for the test but on teaching you the material a college-level English Literature class would teach.

We will be examining literary elements not only as a definition but as a living part of literary works. It is one thing to know what symbolism is and quite another to see it in action and be able to explain its dynamic contribution to the work as a whole. Each type of literature will use these elements in different ways dependent both on their form and their purposes. For that reason, we will look for each element in all three types of literature — fiction, drama, and poetry.

This class will meet twice a week for 90-minutes each. In the week's first webinar, we will read, analyze, and discuss. In the week's second webinar, we will respond to that discussion in writing using the same format as the test. There will be weekly work, independent writing assignments, and group writing assignments in addition to the in-class discussion and writing.

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Prerequisites

Analysis and writing are two very important skills used in Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition. Therefore, prior to taking this class, you will need to have successfully completed at least one upper-level class in literary analysis and at least one upper-level class in academic writing styles. These need not have been Athena’s classes, though they are offered through Athena’s; e.g., Austenisms and How to Write in Any Situation.

You should also complete Athena's AP English Pretest that includes questions similar to the topics we will discuss and the skills this class will require. While you need not get all the questions correct, it is important for you to understand the type of skills we assume enrolling students possess.

 

Assignments

Weekly Work

Every week there will be reading assignments based on the literary element we are discussing that week as listed in this syllabus. It is important that you stay current on these assignments. There will also be a short list of vocabulary words that we will learn and discuss. It is expected that you will find opportunities throughout the year to put these vocabulary words into practice in your writing assignments.

 

Independent Work - Reading Response, Literary Analysis, and Writing Process
You will read the assigned fiction, drama, and poetry throughout the year and complete the writing assignment for each (further explanation of the assignments will be posted in your classroom). One form—poetry—can be especially challenging because of its concise and creative nature. Therefore, you will be keeping an ongoing personal response journal in which you will choose at least two poems each week and record your emotional, intellectual, and creative feelings during and after reading them. For example, while reading Robert Frost’s The Road Not Taken, you may feel nostalgic and peaceful because of the rhythm and imagery and regretful after reading it because of the poem’s theme. This is a simplified response. You will be recording specific instances from the poem that evoke your feelings. You will be submitting your journal entries weekly.
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Additionally, you will have an opportunity to Read, Review, and Respond to longer literary works on an ongoing basis throughout the year and learn to perform these important steps independently. Keep an ongoing reading diary as you read and respond to each work to help you gather evidence for your analysis and prewriting. Each paper will follow this 5-week process:

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  • Week 1

Prewriting submitted and comments left by the teacher for your review. This prewriting should include your rudimentary analysis and evidence as well as your reading diary.

  • Week 2

First draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated and submitted by you.

  • Week 3

Second draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated and submitted by a partner and left for you.

  • Week 4

Third draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated by the teacher and left for you.

  • Week 5

Final draft submitted. Comments on your paper based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay and on your use of the writing process will be left for you by the teacher. These comments will focus both on your assignment and on how you can improve going forward.

We will revisit these works together during the last several weeks of class. We will use APA Style for citations, references, and paper formatting. Please see the Purdue Online Writing Lab for further information on APA Style.

 

Group Work

You will read the assigned fiction, drama, and poetry throughout the year in a small group and meet either in chat, on the forums, or in breakout rooms to discuss and complete the writing assignment for each (further explanation of the meeting requirements and assignments will be posted in your classroom). This will be your chance to Read, Review, and Respond to longer literary works as a small group and discuss and learn with other classmates. We will revisit these works together during the last several weeks of class. For each work, create and maintain a journal of the group’s responses to each of these works as they are read to help you gather evidence for your analysis and prewriting. Each paper will follow this 5-week process:
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  • Week 1

Prewriting submitted and comments left by the teacher for your group’s review. This prewriting should include your group’s rudimentary analysis and evidence as well as your group’s reading diary.

  • Week 2

First draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated and submitted by your group.

  • Week 3

Second draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated and submitted by a partner group and left for your group.

  • Week 4

Third draft submitted and comments on how to improve the draft based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay will be formulated by the teacher and left for your group.

  • Week 5

Final draft submitted. Comments on your group’s paper based on the rubric aspects for that particular essay and on your group’s use of the writing process will be left for your group by the teacher. These comments will focus both on your group’s assignment and on how your group can improve going forward.

Please see the Purdue Online Writing Lab for further information on APA Style.

 

Grading

Because this is a college-level course, you will be receiving a grade for your transcript. That grade will be based on the following scale:

90-100%         A

80-90%           B

70-80%           C

60-70%           D

50-60%           F

0-50%             No Credit

A rubric will accompany each assignment so that you will know the requirements and scores given based on those requirements.

 

Your final grade will also be assigned based on this scale as a simple percentage of total points from these areas. All scores will be equally weighted.

  • Classes - attendance, preparation, assignments, quizzes, and participation based on rubric provided (calculated weekly)
  • Individual Writing Assignments - project based on rubric provided (calculated per assignment)
  • Group Writing Assignments - attendance, preparation, participation, and project based on rubric provided (calculated per assignment)

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Materials

As a college-level class, Advanced Placement English Literature will require readings with themes, language, and situations that may not be suitable for younger children. The works and authors are chosen based on their literary standing and use on past AP exams. No substitutions will be allowed, and parents should review these parameters with their students prior to enrollment. Please feel free to ask questions by emailing the instructor: Deborah Simon at judges4@gmail.com

  • Students must have the ability to scan and email a document.
  • Our textbook is specifically designed for AP English Literature and Composition classes.

Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound & Sense (AP Edition), 11th Edition

ISBN-13: 978-1111351526

ISBN-10: 111135152X

 

  • In addition, we use reading material not including in the textbook. **Those starred are in particular editions or translations and should be purchased with the same ISBN number so you have the text your classmates and I do. Otherwise, the information is provided simply to give you more information about the text. 

**Three-Act Structure: Classified — Mastering the 3-Act Structure, Chike Camara

This text is only available in Kindle Edition. You DO NOT need a Kindle to read it. You can also use your computer or other device.

 

Lady in the Van (French’s Acting Editions), Alan Bennett

ISBN-10: 9780573112669

ISBN-13: 978-0573112669

 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Tennessee Williams

ISBN-10: 0822201895

ISBN-13: 978-0822201892

 

**The Selected Canterbury Tales: A New Verse Translation, 1st Edition, Geoffrey Chaucer

ISBN-13: 978-0393341782

ISBN-10: 039334178X

 

**Agamemnon: A Play by Aeschylus with Reconstructed Stage Directions, Translated from the Greek into English, with Introduction, Notes, and Synopsis, Second Edition, Howard Rubenstein

ISBN-10: 1929468075

ISBN-13: 978-1929468072

 

**Candide, (Dover Thrift Editions) Voltaire

ISBN-10: 0486266893

ISBN-13: 978-0486266893

 

Blood Wedding: A Play, Federico Garcia

ISBN-10: 0571190065

ISBN-13: 978-0571190065

 

The Rape of the Lock, Alexander Pope

ISBN-10: 1314389254

ISBN-13: 978-1314389258

 

Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen

ISBN-10: 0141439661

ISBN-13: 978-0141439662

 

1984, George Orwell

ISBN-10: 0451524934

ISBN-13: 978-0451524935

 

Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe

ISBN-10: 0385474547

ISBN-13: 978-0385474542

 

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald

ISBN-10: 0743273567

ISBN-13: 978-0743273565

 

A Raisin in the Sun, Lorraine Hansberry

ISBN-10: 0679755330

ISBN-13: 978-0679755333

 

Pygmalion, George Bernard Shaw

ISBN-10: 0486282228

ISBN-13: 978-0486282220

 

**Beowulf: A New Verse Translation (Bilingual Edition), Seamus Heaney

ISBN-10: 03933320979

ISBN-13: 978-0393320978

 

The Color Purple, 1st Edition, Alice Walker

ISBN-13: 978-0156031820

ISBN-10: 0156031825

 

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (Favorite Broadway Dramas), Tom Stoppard

ISBN-10: 057361492X

ISBN-13: 978-0573614927

 

Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts, Samuel Beckett

ISBN-10: 080214442X

ISBN-13: 978-0802144423

 

Hamlet, William Shakespeare

ISBN-10: 0451526929

ISBN-13: 978-0451526922

 

Tartuffe, Molière

ISBN-10: 0486411176

ISBN-13: 978-0486411170

  • Free articles will also be used. You can obtain these articles for free on www.jstor.org or from another source. If you create a free account at www.jstor.org, you can read a limited number of articles for free:A

Dramatic Allegory, or, Exploring the Moral Play, Joanne Spencer Kantrowittz

Comparative Drama

Vol. 7, No. 1 (Spring 1973), pp. 68-82

Published by: Comparative Drama

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41152602

 

Symbolism in the Theatre, Frederick M. Tisdel

The Sewanee Review

Vol. 28, No. 2 (Apr., 1920), pp. 228-240

Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27533312

 

Sources of Irony in “Hamlet", Martha Hale Shackford

The Sewanee Review

Vol. 34, No. 1 (Jan., 1926), pp. 12-27

Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27533948

 

For questions or more information about this course please contact:

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Last modified: Monday, April 24, 2017, 1:23 PM